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A network for all who care about the conservation of our world and who want to see it achieved with justice, compassion, dignity and honesty.

Island in a Storm

A conflict between the government and indigenous people threatens one of Brazil’s most unique national parks.

Every year, the forest becomes a veritable inferno as it is set ablaze to facilitate dragging nets along lake bottoms and to make room for illegal cattle pastures. Over the last 10 years, satellites have recorded 3,611 fires inside the park, according to the National Institute for Space Research.

More… Jun 08, 2015

Partnering for Conservation benefits Tacana people

"People asked who it was going to benefit, and how," he said. "They worried that we would lose our traditions."

The idea of a tourism venture first arose in 1998, three years after the park was created. It took another five years to bring it to fruition with assistance from several international non-profit groups, says Constantino Nay, general manager of the tourism operation.

More… Mar 05, 2015

Communities Encouraged to Aid Conservation In Peru

In Peru’s vast northeastern region, where roads are scarce and forests abundant, crackdowns on the illegal plundering of timber, fish, and wildlife are sporadic and expensive. To fill the gap, the Peruvian National Park Service and non-profit conservation organizations encourage community groups to patrol their lakes and forests and control fishing and hunting.

More… Feb 21, 2015

Indigenous territories play dual role as homelands and protected areas

Conservation conundrum: indigenous territories or government protected areas

An article by Barbara Fraser, A Mongabay Special Reporting Initiative Fellow - January 22, 2015. This article was produced under Mongabay.org's Special Reporting Initiatives (SRI) program.

More… Jan 28, 2015

Shipibo community sues Peruvian government for failure to title traditional lands

Forest Peoples Programme - Press Release

The Shipibo indigenous community of Korin Bari today filed a law suit against the Peruvian government for its failure to title its traditional territory resulting in the repeated invasion of community lands by illegal loggers and coca growers threatening the lives of community members who protest - 23rd October 2014, Pucallpa, Peru.

More… Oct 24, 2014

How many more Edwin Chotas?

A discussion contributed by José Álvarez Alonso, Director General – Biodiversity, Ministry of the Environment, Lima, Peru.

Chronicle of a Death Foretold - reflections on illegal logging, land titling and the management of the Amazon forest in the light of events in Ucayali that led to the deaths of Edwin Chota and his colleagues. Una reflexión sobre la tala ilegal, La Titulación De Comunidades Y La Gestión De Los Bosques Amazónicos a raíz de los hechos acaecidos en Ucayali que se sumaban a la muerte de Edwin Chota y sus colegas.

More… Oct 15, 2014

REDD+ versus indigenous people

Why a tribe in Panama rejected pay for their carbon-rich forests. Panama's efforts to gain funding for standing forests roiled by indigenous opposition.

"I have struggled to tell this story in ways that make sense to average readers who understand little about carbon markets and the magnitude of REDD+. One personal goal is to explain the Kuna perspective on REDD+ and their opposition — which is why you see in the piece a focus on them, and not on the REDD+ program per se. I consciously left a lot of the inside-baseball details out, the back-and-forth, because I simply find it not only confusing to the reader, but not relevant to the issue at hand, which was, why did the Kuna (from their perspective, from what they know and what many people told me) reject REDD+? Also, the piece aims to tell a human narrative, and not be a technical report." Ruxandra Guidi

More… Sep 09, 2014

Lessons Learned From Community Forestry In Latin America And Their Relevance For REDD+

This report is one of four reports on “Lessons Learned from Community Forestry and Their Relevance for REDD+" produced for USAID.

Latin America is unique compared with Africa and Asia for several reasons. The Latin America region offers multiple advantages for REDD+. South America has 25 percent of the world's forests and 40 percent of the world’s biodiversity. Only 1.4 percent of Latin America’s forests are plantations; 98.6 percent of Latin American forests are natural forests. Large areas of forest are under indigenous and community tenure – a key base for community forestry and REDD+ success. Rural population density is low. In Latin America, it is very feasible to build on and nurture existing community forestry to achieve REDD+ goals.

More… Jan 27, 2014