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A network for all who care about the conservation of our world and who want to see it achieved with justice, compassion, dignity and honesty.

WWF Helps Industry More than Environment

The WWF is the most powerful environmental organization in the world but a closer look at its work leads to a sobering conclusion: Many of its activities benefit industry more than the environment or endangered species.

Can the WWF truly protect nature against human beings? Or do the organization's attractive posters merely offer the illusion of help? Fifty years after the organization was founded, there are growing doubts as to the independence of the WWF and its business model, which involves partnering with industry to protect nature.

More… Jun 02, 2012

Tribe partners to protect Argentina's most endangered forest

The establishment of the Emerald Green Corridor, which was purchased from logging company Moconá Forestal, ends 16 years of the Guarani communities fighting for their traditional lands.

Once stretching along South America's Atlantic coast from northern Brazil to Argentina, the Atlantic Forest (also known as the Mata Atlantica) has been fragmented by centuries of logging, agriculture, and urbanization. Around 8 percent of the Atlantic Forest still survives, most of it in Brazil, and most of it fragmented and degraded.

More… May 20, 2012

Greenpeace should not choose green over peace

The organisation's support of a marine reserve in the Chagos islands displays a lack of regard for islanders wanting to return

"...Greenpeace seems to have mislaid the "peace" half of its mission. That has been evident for some time to anyone reading its current programme and priorities on its website. This grand drift was on show again at a conference organised by Amnesty International in Oxford last week, where Greenpeace International's executive director, Kumi Naidoo – a man with a proud record of anti-apartheid campaigning – was to talk about human rights and protection of the environment."

More… May 19, 2012

Displaced - The Human Cost of Development and Resettlement

Vivid first-hand accounts by the displaced themselves, gathered by Panos London and partners in Africa and Asia.

The six case-studies that form the core of the book feature the voices of men and women displaced by the Tarbela Dam in Pakistan, pastoralists in Kenya displaced by agricultural and conservation initiatives, groups of San in Botswana and Namibia resettled as a result of government schemes and conservation policies, farming families in India who lost their land and livelihoods to coalmining, and mountain villagers in Lesotho, resettled by the Lesotho Highlands Water Project. By bringing together these individual experiences, the book reveals the loss of cultural continuity and identity, shifts in family responsibilities and gender roles, and fractured relationships between generations that are just some of the complex challenges people face as they attempt to rebuild lives and communities. Although these narratives are suffused with regret and a sense of loss, they also demonstrate resourcefulness and resilience in the face of profound change. Development's social cost continues to be under-reported; these stories are a crucial reminder of its often devastating consequences.

More… May 16, 2012

Video - Natural Resource Management in Northern Thailand

From IMPECT a group focusing on the populations of ten indigenous groups in the highlands of northern Thailand

Thailand has a population of more than 2 million indigenous people. It is estimated that 1.2 million live in the highlands in the north of the country. During the last four decades, most of these areas have been declared by the Thai government as protected areas, meaning that local communities don't have the right to manage their natural resources and to farm in their own areas. As a solution to this problem, FPP partner IMPECT began its natural resource management programme in the North of Thailand.

More… Apr 30, 2012

Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park and its land claimants

A pre- and post-land claim conservation and development history

Abstract. Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park is located in the Northern Cape Province of South Africa and neighbouring Botswana. The local communities on the South African side, the Khomani San (Bushmen) and Mier living adjacent to the park have land rights inside and outside the park. The path from a history of land dispossession to being land owners has created conservation challenges manifested through heightened inter- and intra-community conflicts. The contestations for land and tourism development opportunities in and outside the park have drawn in powerful institutions such as the governments, South African National Parks, private safari companies, local interest groups and NGOs against relatively powerless local communities. This has consequently attracted national and international interest since it may result in further marginalization of the communities who lack the power to negotiate resource access. Moreover, the social and political system of the San is romanticized while little is reported about the Mier, who are an integral part of the park management system. To make these issues more accessible to a growing audience of interested parties and to better understand present conservation and development challenges and opportunities, this paper synthesizes information on the pre- and post-land restitution history of the park and the adjacent communities.

More… Apr 06, 2012

India - The relocation conundrum

How does one ensure the fundamental non-negotiables of equity, justice and sustainability? What values do we want to uphold and what will be the process to make that happen?

"For a while it appeared that the relocation issue had gone onto the back burner because we were not hearing about it a lot. It never disappeared for sure, because it was central in many of the discussions around the declaration of Critical Tiger Habitats, Critical Wildlife Habitats and the Scheduled Tribes and Other....."

More… Mar 27, 2012

Ethiopia: Government Suspends Allocations, Accelerates Domestic Preparation of Land.

The Ministry reported that it receives at least 400 monthly requests for information on investments in the area.

The Ministry of Agriculture denies human rights violations in the clearing of lands that amount to 42 percent of the region, claiming that the relocation of Indigenous peoples who formerly occupied to land was ‘voluntary.’

More… Mar 25, 2012