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A network for all who care about the conservation of our world and who want to see it achieved with justice, compassion, dignity and honesty.

The Immorality of Saving Elephants.

An opinion piece on the enduring debate about Elephant Conservation following the recent CITES meeting that rewarded those with unsuccessful conservation records over those with manifest successes.

More… Sep 16, 2019

Indigenous land rights in the Amazon Basin.

Si no se protege a los pueblos indígenas no se está protegiendo la Amazonía. Los bosques amazónicos están protegiendo el planeta y mitigando el cambio climático por lo tanto es una prioridad alinear las políticas para proteger al mismo tiempo: territorio, pueblos indígenas y bosques. . If indigenous people are not protected then nor is the Amazon. The Amazon forest protects the planet and mitigates climate change which means that it is a priority to align those policies that protect land, indigenous peoples and the forest.

More… Sep 05, 2019

Trophy hunting for conservation and development in Namibia?

The limitations of economic benefits and the role of science

More… Mar 08, 2019

The Alarming Truth Behind Deforestation

Shining the light on the rainforest floor to reveal the growing problem of deforestation.

It’s no secret that the total global rainforest area is decreasing drastically, particularly in Central America and there are multiple factors contributing to this changing landscape including large and small scale architecture, logging and cattle ranching.

More… May 11, 2016

Elephant Engagements and Indigenous Peoples

Borders, Boundaries, and Barriers in Southern Africa

Elephants figure prominently in indigenous peoples’ stories, myths, and memory. Most people in southern Africa do not want to see elephants destroyed; rather, they would prefer to see effective practices and policies put in place that reduce human-elephant conflict.

More… Dec 19, 2015

Why is ‘Just Conservation’ only about people?

'The Just Conservation' site exists to promote debate, raise awareness, promote connection and facilitate action. As such it means we publish a wide variety of views, and we do not necessarily agree with all of them. Recently two controversial academic authors, Helen Kopina and Elle Ouimet, have published a paper in which they asserted that critics of conservation are 'opposed to conservation' (Please note below for the link). We disagree with that characterisation. Conservation is a broad church and we would call ourselves conservationists because we are critical friends of many aspects of it. But that's just our view! We invited these authors to put their perspective forward in a form suitable for this site, and in particular to explain why it might be problematic to 'oppose' (be critical of) conservation. The result, if you accept their arguments, suggests an entirely new way in which 'just conservation' should be approached. As ever, comments are welcome.

More… Oct 07, 2015

War by Conservation

Ivory does not fund Al Shabaab, so why was that message so readily promoted?

Since 2013 several wildlife conservation organisations have promoted the message that ivory is used to fund terrorism, that it is the ‘white gold of jihad’. While allegations about poaching by Janjaweed and Lord’s Resistance Army have circulated for some time, it was the claim that ivory provided up to 40% of Al Shabaab’s funding that caught international attention. This claim is hotly disputed, and even Elephant Action League, who spread the message in the first place, have started to accept it might have been an over estimation (at best). So why was it so readily taken up and repeated in the media, social media, by world leaders, by conservation NGOs and by international organisations? The answer lies in a potent mix of strategic interests and the need to grab international attention to raise funds for conservation.

More… Sep 25, 2015

Conservation and Conflict: People, State Policies, and Protected Areas In Southern Africa

A paper presented by Robert K. Hitchcock at the conference in Seville, Spain on Warfare, Environment, Social Inequality and Peace Studies. May 29th 2015.

This paper by Robert K. Hitchcock, Maria Sapignoli and Wayne A. Babchuk (1) explores questions of the ethics of wildlife conservation, (2) examines human rights, animal rights, and community based conflict management approaches, and (3) assesses who has the power to determine policies and practices related to land and natural resources.

More… Jun 07, 2015